#Blog: Why Minimizing Airborne Noise Emissions Is So Important for UAM

May 17, 2022

One of the major hurdles to launching a robust commercial urban air mobility (UAM) ecosystem are airborne noise emissions. One of the main challenges facing all UAM manufacturers is to actually devise workable strategies that will effectively limit airborne noise emissions on the ground. In terms of its noise signature, Volocopter took the proverbial bull by the horns right from day one by integrating noise-limiting features into the design of its rotor and tip speeds. Overall, Volocopter will do this by ensuring low disc loading – the lowest disc loading currently on the market, in fact! – and a low RPM (revolutions per minute) rate; together, these will yield the requisite low noise emissions both during takeoff and landing (a feature that separates Volocopter from other VTOL concepts).

One of the major hurdles to launching a robust commercial urban air mobility (UAM) ecosystem are airborne noise emissions. So, we’ve been working hard to keep them to a minimum. Here’s how.

Near-silent skies
Is there anything worse than being stuck in an ear-splitting traffic jam? Well, there just might be. One of the main challenges facing all UAM manufacturers is to actually devise workable strategies that will effectively limit airborne noise emissions on the ground. And bring you peace of mind in more ways than one. 

In terms of its noise signature, Volocopter took the proverbial bull by the horns right from day one by integrating noise-limiting features into the design of its rotor and tip speeds. Now, it is working very closely with its partners Aéroports de Paris (ADP) and RATP (the city’s public transportation authority) to do everything it can to keep its airborne noise emissions in check in Paris too, as it gears up for commercial launch in time for the 2024 Paris Olympics.  

Why does this matter? Because public acceptance of all electric vehicles matters. And the way to secure this in the French capital is to map out routes inside the city that ensure the Volocopter aircraft do not generate a cacophony that exceeds the city’s permitted noise levels. Part of its approach will involve flying at specific times of day. Overall, Volocopter will do this by ensuring low disc loading – the lowest disc loading currently on the market, in fact! – and a low RPM (revolutions per minute) rate; together, these will yield the requisite low noise emissions both during takeoff and landing (a feature that separates Volocopter from other VTOL concepts). So how has the UAM pioneer been documenting its progress? 

The source of this news is from Volocopter